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Author Topic: Info Chart  (Read 1381 times)

FiahOwl

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Info Chart
« on: December 06, 2011, 07:49:38 AM »


Where the flipin' heck are Dwarf Planets?

smjjames

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2011, 09:00:33 AM »
Cool chart and I guess we just haven't been able to detect the dwarf planets yet, which could be so far out that it takes decades or centuries to orbit.

We haven't really found sub-terran size planets yet either, yet.

Darvince

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2011, 04:24:38 PM »
Eris takes 5.5 centuries to orbit, so...

dhm794

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2011, 01:14:51 PM »
Rouge planets intrigue me for some reason.  The name just sounds so dark and mysterious.

Omnigeek6

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2011, 03:29:46 PM »
Detecting dwarf planet in our own system is hard enough, but detecting something like Pluto from light years away would be impossible with today's technology. It has a tiny mass and a long orbital period, so detecting it with radial velocity measurements is nearly impossible. With an orbit tens or even hundreds of AU from the central star, the odds of it transiting are almost zero. Forget about direct imaging, we can barely image these things in our own system.

FiahOwl

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2011, 03:33:23 PM »
Detecting dwarf planet in our own system is hard enough, but detecting something like Pluto from light years away would be impossible with today's technology. It has a tiny mass and a long orbital period, so detecting it with radial velocity measurements is nearly impossible. With an orbit tens or even hundreds of AU from the central star, the odds of it transiting are almost zero. Forget about direct imaging, we can barely image these things in our own system.

I meant: Dwarf planets are a type of planet, right?

FiahOwl

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2011, 04:23:05 PM »

blotz

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2011, 05:41:17 PM »
For the habitable zones, is it the closer to the middle the better, or is it almost the same climate?

smjjames

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2011, 08:02:04 PM »
Well, the closer to the middle, the more Earthlike the climate will be, we just happen to be smack in the middle of the habitable zone of ours.

Closer to the middle is optimal for Terran life, and really though, the habitable zone is much fuzzier than the one in US appears to give. Venus is a bit beyond the inner edge in US and it is along the inner edge of the HZ in RL, but if it didn't have a runaway greenhouse effect, it would still be hot (average temperature being 150 F if it had an earth setting atmosphere in US), but there would be liquid water and thus the possibility of life. Mars on the other hand is at the outer edge and using the earth atmosphere setting goes below 0 degrees F for most of the time, but with a sufficiently thick atmosphere or sufficient CO2, it would be warm enough for liquid water and there are plenty of signs that it had liquid water at one point in its past.

What I'm saying is that it's somewhat fuzzy because you have to take into account other factors. If Earth lost its magnetic field, it might have ended up like Mars (or at least Hoth as it would have more water) and as I said above, the atmosphere is a major factor.

Also, the boiling point of water I referred to is that of water at sea level atmospheric pressure, so if Venus's atmosphere were denser, the boiling point would be higher.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2011, 08:17:27 AM by smjjames »

FiahOwl

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2011, 09:07:44 PM »
Mars on the other hand is at the outer edge and using the earth atmosphere setting goes below 0 degrees F for most of the time, but with a sufficiently thick atmosphere or sufficient C2O, it would be warm enough for liquid water and there

OOH! OHH! Whats this new "two carbon bonded to an oxygen atom" thing?

Darvince

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2011, 10:13:22 PM »
It's not possible.

vh

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2011, 07:06:15 AM »
Oxidedicarbon
Kolwut

smjjames

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Re: Info Chart
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2011, 08:15:56 AM »
Whoop lol..... I'll fixeh.