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Author Topic: Is constant rain possible?  (Read 1352 times)

Gordon Freeman

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Is constant rain possible?
« on: February 19, 2016, 12:00:16 PM »
I had an idea for a fictional planet a couple years ago where there was so much water vapor in the atmosphere that the water cycle would go by faster than a rainstorm could finish, thus keeping it raining forever.

Is this scientifically plausible?

Cryo

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Re: Is constant rain possible?
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2016, 05:32:32 PM »
that sounds like Dromund Kaas

Austritistanian

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Re: Is constant rain possible?
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2016, 02:01:59 AM »
It is sort of plausible. If your planet is a water planet (mostly made of water like Kepler-22b), and relatively close to its host star (e.g. 70,000,000 km), It should create a great condition for such scenario, thought it will only happen near the equator, however (0-40 latitude)

Austritistanian

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Re: Is constant rain possible?
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2016, 07:03:51 AM »
Bump

Darvince

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Re: Is constant rain possible?
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2016, 02:24:37 PM »
he left the forum

particleman

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Re: Is constant rain possible?
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2017, 04:18:47 PM »
It certainly is possible.
For example: if you had a body of water that was constantly being heated by something that wasn't blocked by clouds or night, you'd have constant evaporation. Water vapor would rise and cool at high altitudes, then rain.
Two things come to mind that could do this: geothermal energy--maybe from a newly formed planet, or from vigorous tidal stress, or being tidally locked to some radio-bright object