Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Superhot Random Bodies  (Read 1316 times)

Gordon Freeman

  • *****
  • Posts: 480
Superhot Random Bodies
« on: December 18, 2014, 04:57:49 AM »
When I place a random object, they usually spawn with magma oceans regardless of the distance to their star.

I placed a random small moon at about .800 AU and it spawned as a comet.

Spartan117jmc

  • ***
  • Posts: 27
Re: Superhot Random Bodies
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2015, 12:44:14 PM »
HA i have the opposite problem.although only if they are over a certain size. I've tried everything even with an atmosphere the mass of Jupiter and placing the planet just 5000 KM away from the sun. still it shows -279*C
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 12:33:25 PM by Spartan117jmc »

C7

  • Development Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
Re: Superhot Random Bodies
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2015, 07:28:40 PM »
It's quite possible there's a bug that's cropped up with the temperatures. I'll recheck that they're operating as expected.

Just to be clear, it's currently designed to work like this. Certain bodies have a defined starting temperature (like Earth), so the planet enters the simulation as what you expect to see, not a molten wasteland, or an ice ball.

If it's using the generic handling, it will automatically find the instant temperature of the body, based on it's distance to the surrounding stars. (As if it had been there long enough to stabilize), In a simulation with no stars. The body will come in at 0 kelvin (-273.15)


Spartan117jmc

  • ***
  • Posts: 27
Re: Superhot Random Bodies
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2015, 11:12:12 AM »
I have found that if it locks at a low temperature when you spawn an object, setting the temp up to a ludicrous amount will make it crawl back down to its real position if near a star.

NOTE! i tried making a planet That was Rocky and at the size of 12 Jupiter's. it has water land and an atmosphere but nothing i did made the temperature go below minus 200. not even placing it almost next to a star. (Canis Majoris.)

Update: Setting the luminosity on Canis Majoris to 10000 seemed to heat up the huge planet when it was right next to the star. it climbed to well over 10.000 degrees even though Canis Majoris has a temperature of 3490.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 11:28:05 AM by Spartan117jmc »