Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Are we only observing HALF of TIME?  (Read 163 times)

JMBuilder

  • *****
  • Posts: 86
  • The demand for memes is high.
Are we only observing HALF of TIME?
« on: January 19, 2018, 01:10:31 AM »
If time is its own dimension, why do we only observe it moving in one direction (at varying rates, but still)?

For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction...

So... If time is moving one direction, what's moving in the other?

Is there "anti-time?"

Physics_Hacker

  • *****
  • Posts: 376
Re: Are we only observing HALF of TIME?
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2018, 01:53:09 PM »
Most of physics agrees that time can be run backwards and everything still...sort of...makes sense. If gravity is set to ruck backwards, and the momentum of particles is reversed, their angular momentum, etc., things still make physical sense. Except some particles break this time symmetry, they don't make sense when run backwards. Plus theres the issue of entropy: If the universe ran backwards, everything would have to be collecting more and more energy and the universe would become more and more ordered and smaller, an example I see a lot of this is mixing cream into coffee, it takes way more energy to separate them than to mix them together. So while its possible time could run backwards, it wouldn't exactly make sense, so we perceive time as going in the direction it does because thats the way that everything makes sense. Its like if you drew a line segment (lines are infinitely long) from Earth out into space, and then added a particle halfway along that line, and let gravity do its thing, it would fall along the line toward Earth. It wouldn't make sense for it to start moving away from Earth in a similar way that it wouldn't make sense for time to run backwards. We can't rule out the possibility, however, that in another universe physics wouldn't be different in a way that would allow time to run either way, or even move forward and backward depending on what's happening in the space component of spacetime.