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Author Topic: What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?  (Read 3213 times)

ahoop

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What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?
« on: September 15, 2015, 08:34:22 AM »
When I created my planet, I found that it had blue clouds instead of white, and its atmosphere is teal. I'm writing its description in Wordpad, and I think the composition should be oxygen/neon. Would that make blue clouds?

There are also weird stationary cloud like formations that can be easily seen from the night side. Bug?
« Last Edit: September 15, 2015, 08:40:31 AM by ahoop »

The Ventifact

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Re: What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2015, 08:44:58 AM »
Yeah, I think the Alpha 16.1 update created some unintended changes. Every single planet I terraform gets blue clouds, I have not been able to get them any other color. As for the "stationary" clouds, I don't think they are, because if you fill the planet with water until the land is covered, it still retains a lighter color around the surface feature that was covered.

Or it could be terrain and not clouds. It depends on the random planet spawned. One almost looked like snow-capped mountains when I was spawning planets. You can report it with the in-game feedback, that's what I did.

ahoop

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Re: What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2015, 08:52:37 AM »
As for the "stationary" clouds, I don't think they are, because if you fill the planet with water until the land is covered, it still retains a lighter color around the surface feature that was covered.

 You can report it with the in-game feedback, that's what I did.
Yep, that's exactly what it was. Still looks cool though.

Arian

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Re: What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2015, 12:44:18 AM »
The clouds on any planet in US2 are actually made of water I think. You can test that by removing the water from your planet. That means the (apparent) color of your clouds is determined by the atmosphere while the clouds are actually white like any water in steam form.
But even if the steam was from any other liquid, the clouds would be likely to appear white. Just because you can turn off the visibility of the atmosphere in US2 that doesn't mean it is gone. If that was true, your clouds would not be visible at all because they would actually make the atmosphere or simply do a fallout back into liquid or frozen state. Clouds do "swim" in the atmosphere, they need a medium to carry the microscopic drops of liquid they are made of.
The color of your atmosphere is determined by atmospheric transmission curves (do a google on that if you like). It not only depends on the composition but also on the color of your star's light. Dust in the atmosphere can play a big role too.

Those "stationary clouds" are a reported glitch that will hopefully be dealt with in the next update. While it may look cool at first it is rather annoying if all planets in a system look the same on their shadowed side.

As for "only blue clouds":

Dan Dixon

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Re: What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2015, 08:41:51 PM »
Can someone write out what the reproduction steps are to cause this? Blue clouds feels like a bug that we want to fix.

Arian

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Re: What atmosphere composition can create blue/teal clouds?
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2015, 11:03:19 AM »
What about red clouds then?
To reproduce it you actually only need a (random rocky) planet with atmosphere and liquid water. The clouds will have the color of the atmosphere. Blue is just the most common. Higher density of the atmosphere makes it more visible.

Or did you mean that strange missing texture layer? That is actually a clean white thing that has the shape of alpha 16 textures of a formerly molten and then cooled down rocky planet's landmass. It is visible on every rocky planet if you add water manually and best shows on the night side of a planet, hiding the original texture almost perfectly.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2015, 11:12:55 AM by Arian »